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This page contains historical photos of Ontario's King's Highway 2 dating from 1946 to 1959. All photographs displayed on this page were taken by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation, unless specifically noted otherwise. Historical photographs are arranged in approximate chronological order. Click on any thumbnail to see a larger image!

Please note that all photographs displayed on this website are protected by copyright. These photographs must not be reproduced, published, electronically stored or copied, distributed, or posted onto other websites without my written permission. If you want to use photos from this website, please email me first for permission. Thank-you!

Page 2: Historical King's Highway 2 Photographs (1946 to 1959)


HWY 2 #129

Above - View of Hwy 2, three miles east of London (1948)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1948)





HWY 2 #244

NEW Above - Construction of a rock breakwater to control shoreline erosion on Hwy 2 east of Burlington (1948)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1948)





HWY 2 #10             HWY 2 #11

Left - Asphalt paving operations on Hwy 2, three miles east of Newtonville. Photo taken on June 23, 1949.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1949)

Right - Overlaying concrete pavement with asphalt on Hwy 2, 4 1/2 miles east of Windsor. Photo taken on June 5, 1950.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1950)





HWY 2 #13             HWY 2 #14

Left - New Hwy 2 Bridge in Napanee in 1950. The new structure bypassed the old one-lane bridge at left.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1950)

Right - Another view of the new concrete bridge on Hwy 2 in Napanee (1950)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1950)





HWY 2 #12             HWY 2 #15

Left - New asphalt pavement and zone striping on Hwy 2, 12 1/2 miles east of Windsor. Photo taken on June 5, 1950.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1950)

Right - New pavement and zone painting on Hwy 2, 1 mile west of Princeton. Photo taken on July 13, 1951.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)





HWY 2 #126             HWY 2 #131

Left - View of Hwy 2, 3 1/2 miles west of Trenton. Photo taken on June 13, 1950.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)

Right - Dundas Street (Hwy 2) in Downtown London approaching Hwy 4 & Hwy 22 Junction (1951)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)





HWY 3B #6

Above - Facing west along Ouellette Avenue towards Downtown Windsor. Photo taken on July 10, 1951. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)

Note the signpost at right, which bears no fewer than four King's Highway shields. Although the route numbers are difficult to discern in this photo, the four marked routes are Hwy 2, Hwy 3B, Hwy 39 and Hwy 98. For a number of years, all four of these King's Highways were signed concurrently along Ouellette Avenue into Downtown Windsor. However, due to the construction of the E.C. Row Expressway and the decommissioning of Hwy 39 and Hwy 98, three of these highway routes were eventually removed from Ouellette Avenue. Only the Hwy 3B route designation survived until the 1990s.





HWY 2 #17             HWY 2 #18

Left - New Hwy 2 diversion in 1951, 3 miles east of Colborne
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)

Right - Zone painting on Hwy 2, 8 miles west of Port Hope. Photo taken on October 9, 1951.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)





HWY 2 #190

Above - Hwy 2 heading west out of Chatham (1951)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)

This interesting photo shows an example of a three lane Ontario highway. Three lane highways such as this had become relatively common by the 1950s. The intention of this highway design was to allow passing in the centre lane by vehicles travelling in either direction. Both sides of the centre passing lane were marked with dashed white lines. For many years, drivers seldom had to consider who actually had the right-of-way to use the centre lane, since traffic volumes on these highways were quite light. However, as Ontario's highways became busier, it was necessary to legally assign the right-of-way to one direction of traffic only. Beginning in the 1950s, passing lanes such as this were marked with signs conveying messages to drivers to "Pass only when centre lane is clear" or "Yield centre lane to opposing traffic".





HWY 2 #191

Above - Facing east along Hwy 2 at the western entrance to Chatham (1951)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)





HWY 2 #242             HWY 2 #16

NEW Left - New Department of Highways' Garage west of Lambeth on Hwy 2 (1951)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)

Right - Salt spreader at work on Hwy 2 (Kingston Road) near the Rouge River. Photo taken on December 5, 1951.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)





HWY 2 #241             HWY 2 #243

NEW Left - Winter snow-clearing equipment at the Lambeth Garage on Hwy 2. Photo taken on June 5, 1952.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1952)

NEW Right - Interior of the Department of Highways' Garage west of Lambeth on Hwy 2. Photo taken on June 5, 1952.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1952)





HWY 2 #240             HWY 2 #238

NEW Left - Department of Highways' Sign Truck at the Port Hope District Garage (1952)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1952)

NEW Right - Entrance to the new Eastwood Truck Scales and Scale House on Hwy 2 near Woodstock (1954)
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1954)





HWY 2 #239             HWY 2 #237

NEW Left - Paving operations on Hwy 2, two miles east of Dickenson's Landing in 1954. This photo and the one at right show sections of the original route of Hwy 2, which were flooded as a result of the St. Lawrence Seaway construction in the late 1950s. Between 1954 and 1957, approximately 37 miles of Hwy 2 had to be relocated inland onto higher ground to bypass those parts of the valley which lay below the proposed Seaway flood line. The section of Hwy 2 shown here in this 1954 photo is now submerged under the St. Lawrence River near Moulinette Island south of Long Sault. Photo taken on July 20, 1954.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1954)

NEW Right - Newly-paved section of Hwy 2, one mile west of Farran's Point in 1954. This section of Hwy 2 was flooded four years after this photo was taken, and now lies submerged under the St. Lawrence River near Morrison Island southwest of Ingleside. Photo taken on July 20, 1954.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1954)





HWY 2 #125

Above - Resurfaced section of Hwy 2, 6 1/2 miles west of Odessa. Photo taken on July 23, 1954.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1954)





HWY 2 #236

NEW Above - New Parry Bridge over the Thames River on Keil Drive in Chatham in 1954. This municipal road project proved to be so effective in diverting through traffic around Downtown Chatham, that the Department of Highways eventually incorporated Keil Drive and the Parry Bridge into the route of a Hwy 2 Bypass around Chatham in 1957.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1954)





HWY 2 #234

NEW Above - Channelized right turn ramps at the junction of Old Hwy 2 and Relocated Hwy 2 in Cornwall in 1956. This interesting view shows Brookdale Avenue (Relocated Hwy 2) facing south towards Second Avenue (Old Hwy 2), just before the construction of the Seaway International Bridge began at right.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1956)





HWY 2 #235

NEW Above - Zone striping on a section of Relocated Hwy 2, four miles west of Cornwall in 1956. Approximately 37 miles of Hwy 2 was relocated onto a new alignment in the late 1950s to accommodate the construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Most of the original Hwy 2 alignment between Iroquois and Cornwall lay below the proposed Seaway flood line and was closed to through traffic before the valley was flooded in 1958.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1956)





HWY 401 #1487

Above - Highways Minister James N. Allan and Woodstock Mayor C.M. Tatham shake hands after using an axe to chop down a "Road Closed to Traffic" sign at the Hwy 2 Cloverleaf at the eastern entrance to the London-Woodstock Bypass section of Hwy 401. Official opening ceremonies were held in both Woodstock and London on Friday, May 31, 1957, to mark the completion of a 38-mile section of Hwy 401 between Hwy 2 and Hwy 4. This section of Hwy 401 took 5 years to construct at a cost (in 1957 Dollars) of $19.7 million, the equivalent of roughly $175 million today. Photo taken on May 31, 1957. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1957)





QEW #648

Above - Facing north along the Queen Elizabeth Way at the new Hwy 2 (North Shore Boulevard) Interchange in Burlington in 1958. Prior to the completion of the underpass and interchange, Hwy 2 crossed the Queen Elizabeth Way at an at-grade intersection. Note the small plywood guide sign at right, advising motorists of the upcoming Hwy 2 West exit ramp. In an effort to improve on sign legibility on Ontario's freeways, small plywood guide signs such as this example were phased out and replaced with ground-mounted extruded aluminum signs in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1958)





HWY 401 #41

Above - Junction of Hwy 2 & Hwy 401 (Thousand Islands Parkway) near Brockville, facing west towards Gananoque. Photo taken on August 8, 1958. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photo © Archives of Ontario  -  Series RG-14-151-5-15, Photo #999)





HWY 2 #63

Above - Circa 1959 postcard showing an aerial view of the construction of the Gardiner Expressway (Hwy 2) in Toronto at Jameson Avenue.
(Photo courtesy of Metro Toronto News Company, Scarborough)





HWY 2 #130

Above - Replacement of the Port Credit Bridge on Hwy 2 in 1959. The original concrete bowstring arch bridge at right was constructed by the Toronto and Hamilton Highway Commission in 1918, years before the Lakeshore Road was designated as King's Highway 2. During the bridge reconstruction project, Hwy 2 traffic was diverted over the Credit River across temporary Bailey Bridges.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1959)




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