Hwy 50 Hwy 50 Hwy 50   

Ontario Highway 50 Quick Facts:
  • Years in Existence: 1936-1998
  • Current Status: Decommissioned in 1998
  • Current Name: Peel Road 50, York Road 24 & Simcoe Road 50
  • Location: Southern Ontario
  • Counties Served: York, Peel & Simcoe
  • Towns Served: Toronto, Bolton & Palgrave
  • Southern Terminus: Hwy 27 - Toronto
  • Northern Terminus: Hwy 89 - West of Alliston
  • Length in 1997: 53.6 km / 33.3 miles
HWY 50 - © Cameron Bevers
King's Highway 50 Sign © Cameron Bevers

History of King's Highway 50:

King's Highway 50 was a major collector highway which connected Highway 27 in Toronto to Highway 89 west of Alliston. The highway was 54 km in length and it existed up until the late 1990s, when it was downloaded to the County of Simcoe and the Regional Municipalities of York and Peel.

The history of Highway 50 dates back to 1936, when the road from Bolton to the Highway 49 Junction near Nashville was designated as a new King's Highway. A Preliminary Route Plan was prepared dated May 28, 1936, showing the proposed route of a new King's Highway through Peel County. The route of Highway 50 began at the Highway 49 Junction west of Kleinburg and continued north where the route ended at King Street in Downtown Bolton. The route was assumed as King's Highway 50 by the Department of Highways of Ontario (DHO) on August 12, 1936. Originally, the highway was only 5.5 km in length. The following year, Highway 50 was extended southerly from the Highway 49 Junction to Highway 7 and northerly from Bolton to Highway 9. A Preliminary Route Plan was prepared dated May 13, 1937, showing the proposed north extension of Highway 50 from Bolton northerly to Highway 9, via Palgrave. This section of Highway 50 was assumed by the DHO on August 11, 1937. Another Preliminary Route Plan was prepared in June 1937, showing the proposed south extension of Highway 50 from the Highway 49 Junction southerly to Highway 7. This section of Highway 50 was assumed by the DHO on October 6, 1937. Once these new sections of Highway 50 were assumed by the DHO in 1937, the length of the highway had grown to 29 km (See Map).

Initially, the entire highway was gravel-surfaced, except for the section from the Highway 49 Junction to Bolton which was paved. Some paving work was carried out on a two mile section of Highway 50 immediately north of Highway 7 in 1937, but it was not until 1946 that the entire route of Highway 50 from the Highway 7 Junction to the Highway 49 Junction was paved with asphalt. The remaining unpaved section of Highway 50 between Bolton and the Highway 9 Junction was paved in 1951. In 1961, Highway 50 was extended southerly from the Highway 7 Junction to Highway 27 in Toronto. This extension added another 6 km to the length of Highway 50. The DHO assumed the road from Highway 7 to the north Metro Toronto Limits at Steeles Avenue as an extension of Highway 50 on April 6, 1961. The section of Highway 50 lying south of Steeles Avenue via Albion Road was not assumed by the DHO, and thus that section of the route remained under municipal jurisdiction. The section of Highway 50 through Bolton was transferred to the Village of Bolton, effective November 21, 1964. The section of Highway 50 through Bolton was designated as a Municipal Connecting Link, effective December 3, 1964.

During the 1970s, the route of Highway 50 was extended north from the Highway 9 Junction to the Highway 89 Junction near Alliston. The extension was created when a 20 km section of Simcoe County Road 12 via Loretto was assumed by the province. A Preliminary Assumption Plan was prepared by the Ministry of Transportation & Communications (MTC) on October 26, 1976, indicating the intention to assume existing Simcoe County Road 12 between Highway 9 and Highway 89 as a new King's Highway. The plan was registered on November 15, 1976, and the extension of Highway 50 was formally designated as a King's Highway by an Order-in-Council, effective January 26, 1977 (See Map).

In the late 1990s, the entire highway was downloaded. A 2.1 km section of Highway 50 from the City of Toronto limits at Steeles Avenue to Highway 7 was transferred to the Regional Municipality of York on April 9, 1997. Signs were slowly removed along the non-assumed municipal section of Highway 50 along Albion Road in the City of Toronto. The rest of Highway 50 from the Highway 7 Junction to the Highway 89 Junction was transferred to the Regional Municipalities of York and Peel and the County of Simcoe on January 1, 1998. Highway 50 is now officially known as Simcoe County Road 50, Peel Regional Road 50 and York Regional Road 24. Within the City of Toronto, the former route of Highway 50 is simply called Albion Road. Despite the fact that this road is no longer a provincial highway, motorists nearly always refer to this route collectively as "Highway 50". Services are available in most communities along the highway. Unless posted otherwise, the speed limit on Highway 50 is 80 km/h (50 mph). Please visit the Highway 50 Mileage Chart page for a list of mileage reference points along Highway 50.





HWY 50 ROUTE MAP - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 50 MILEAGE TABLE - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 50 PHOTOGRAPHS - © Cameron Bevers


Additional Information About King's Highway 50:

Learn More About King's Highway 50  (My Upcoming Publications)

King's Highway 50 - Route Information  (At Scott Steeves' website: asphaltplanet.ca)

King's Highway 50 - A Virtual Tour  (At Scott Steeves' website: asphaltplanet.ca)


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