Hwy 140 Sign Graphic Hwy 140 Title Graphic Hwy 140 Sign Graphic   

This page contains historical and present day photos of Ontario's King's Highway 140 and East Main Street (Highway 7146). All photographs displayed on this page were taken by the Webmaster (Cameron Bevers), unless specifically noted otherwise. Historical photographs are arranged in approximate chronological order, while present day photographs (Year 2000 to date) are arranged by location from south to north. Click on any thumbnail to see a larger image!

Please note that all photographs displayed on this website are protected by copyright. These photographs must not be reproduced, published, electronically stored or copied, distributed, or posted onto other websites without my written permission. If you want to use photos from this website, please email me first for permission. Thank-you!

Historical King's Highway 140 Photographs


HWY 140 #37             HWY 140 #38

Left - Open cut excavation for the new East Main Street Tunnel under the proposed Welland Canal relocation, Contract #1970-10. This was one of two new tunnels built under the relocated Welland Canal's route in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The Department of Highways of Ontario (DHO) built the East Main Street Tunnel on a cost-sharing basis with the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority. This tunnel linked Welland's East Main Street with Welland County Road 11 (now known as Niagara Regional Road 27). Construction began on the nearby Townline Tunnel in 1969, but this project was built exclusively by the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken in 1970.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 1970)

Right - Construction progress on the new East Main Street Tunnel in 1971. This tunnel was constructed within a trench below the proposed route of the Welland Canal Diversion. Once the tunnel tube was completed, the trench was backfilled and the Welland Canal Diversion constructed on top of it. The East Main Street Tunnel was built under a two-party agreement between DHO and the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority, at an approximate cost of $8.1 million (in 1971 Dollars), the equivalent of about $59 million in 2022 Dollars. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken in 1971.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 1971)





HWY 140 #39

Above - Completed portal for the new East Main Street Tunnel in Welland in 1972. This photo shows the tunnel nearing completion, after final grading had been completed for the relocated Welland Canal over top of the tunnel. The East Main Street Tunnel linked Welland with the newly-constructed route of Hwy 140 to Port Colborne along with Niagara Regional Road 27. The new tunnel was completed and opened to traffic in 1972, after nearly three years of construction. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken in 1972.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 1972)





HWY 140 #19 - © Cameron Bevers

Above - Eastern side of the Canadian National Railway (CNR) Overhead on Hwy 140 near Forks Road between Port Colborne and Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on April 17, 1975.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #20             HWY 140 #23

Left - CNR Overhead on Hwy 140 near Forks Road north of Port Colborne, facing north towards Welland. This railway overhead was built by DHO under Contract #1970-212 as part of the construction of Hwy 140 between Welland and Port Colborne. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on April 17, 1975.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)

Right - Facing east along Hwy 58A (Townline Tunnel Road) towards the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140 in Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on April 17, 1975.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #21

Above - Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140 in Welland. This multi-span structure carries Hwy 140 over the Townline Tunnel Approach. The Townline Tunnel is both a road and railway tunnel which passes below the nearby Welland Canal. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on April 17, 1975.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #22

Above - Facing north along Hwy 140 towards Welland at the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass. Photo taken on April 17, 1975.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #24             HWY 140 #25

Left - North abutment of the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140 in Welland. Note the Hwy 140 & Hwy 58A Junction assembly beside the bridge. Although the Hwy 140 structure does pass over Hwy 58A, the two highways do connect with each other a short distance to the north. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on September 7, 1978.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)

Right - Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140, as seen from Hwy 58A (Townline Tunnel Road) in Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on September 7, 1978.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #27             HWY 140 #26

Left - Close-up view of the exposed concrete deck on the CNR Overhead on Hwy 140 north of Port Colborne. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on September 7, 1978.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)

Right - Facing north across the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on June 27, 1980.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #28             HWY 140 #29

Left - Facing north along Hwy 140 towards Welland at the CNR Overhead near Forks Road north of Port Colborne. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on June 27, 1980.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)

Right - View of the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140, facing north towards Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on July 24, 1984.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #30             HWY 140 #32

Left - Deck view of the CNR Overhead on Hwy 140 between Port Colborne and Welland, facing north. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on July 24, 1984.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)

Right - Facing south along Hwy 140 towards Port Colborne at the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass. Note the highway distance sign at right, which still has an educational "km" tab affixed to it. After Ontario's highways converted to Metric measurements in 1977, these tabs were placed on all distance signs to advise motorists that the distances were in kilometres, not miles. Many of these "km" tabs have been removed from distance signs over the years. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on June 3, 1986.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #31             HWY 140 #33

Left - Facing north along Hwy 140 towards Welland at the CNR Overhead on Hwy 140 north of Port Colborne. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on June 3, 1986.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)

Right - Distance guide sign on southbound Hwy 140 at the Hwy 58A Junction in Welland. Note that the educational "km" tab seen in the 1986 photo above has been removed. Many of the "km" tabs installed in 1977 were removed during the 1980s as motorists became more accustomed to Metric measurements. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on June 16, 1988.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #34             HWY 140 #35

Left - Side view of the CNR Overhead on Hwy 140 near Forks Road between Port Colborne and Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on August 16, 1990.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)

Right - Facing south along Hwy 140 towards Port Colborne at the CNR Overhead near Forks Road. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on August 16, 1990.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)





HWY 140 #36

Above - Facing north along Hwy 140 towards Welland at the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass. This structure was rehabilitated in the early 1990s and the exposed concrete deck was overlaid with an asphalt wearing surface. Note the new eccentric loader steel beam guiderail end terminal installation at right. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on August 16, 1994.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © King's Printer for Ontario, 2022)


Present Day King's Highway 140 Photographs


HWY 140 #3 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #2 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Approaching the southern terminus of Hwy 140 at the Hwy 3 Junction in Port Colborne. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing north along Hwy 140 towards Welland from the Hwy 3 Junction in Port Colborne. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #1 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #4 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Green guide signs facing southbound Hwy 140 traffic approaching the Hwy 3 Junction. Traffic bound for Port Colborne can turn right and head west into the city centre. Traffic heading east along Hwy 3 from this junction will reach Fort Erie and the Peace Bridge to Buffalo, New York. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing north along Hwy 140 towards Welland near Ramey Road in Port Colborne, located about 1 km north of Hwy 3. Hwy 140 was built as a limited-access highway on an entirely new alignment in the early 1970s. The route forms a short but important highway link along the eastern side of the Welland Canal between Port Colborne and Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #11 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #5 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing south along Hwy 140 at the Port Colborne City Limits, located about 7 km north of the Hwy 3 Junction. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - View of Hwy 140 at the Welland City Limits, facing north. The boundary between Port Colborne and Welland lies at the appropriately-named Townline Tunnel. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #6 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #7 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing north along Hwy 140 towards Welland at the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass. This structure was originally built to carry Hwy 140 over the Townline Tunnel Road (Hwy 58A) along with both the Canadian National Railway (CNR) and Penn Central Railway (PCR). Today, both railway lines are operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR). See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Western side of the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140. This five-span steel beam structure was built by CNR in 1971 as part of the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority's preparation for the Townline Tunnel below the relocated Welland Canal to the west. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #8 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #9 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Despite being built by CNR, the Hwy 140 structure uses the standard DHO double handrail parapet wall that was commonly used on provincial bridges of this era. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Below-deck view of the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140. The piers of this structure have embossed stripes as a decorative feature. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #10 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #12 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Eastern side of the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass on Hwy 140 in Welland. The nearby Townline Tunnel carries two railway lines as well as Hwy 58A (Townline Tunnel Road). The eastern portal of the Townline Tunnel lies about 1,500 metres west of the Hwy 140 structure. An astronomical volume of earth had to be removed in order to construct the Townline Tunnel Approach. The Hwy 140 bridge deck sits at the approximate original ground line, which means that everything lying below that point had to be excavated and hauled away. The scale of the Welland Canal Diversion Project and all of its associated works was quite astounding! See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing south along Hwy 140 towards Port Colborne at the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass. Since the structure was built more or less at the original ground line with the tunnel approach excavated underneath, there was no need to change the profile of Hwy 140 as it crosses the structure. In fact, there is no significant grade change across the structure at all. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #13 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #14 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Close-up of the DHO double-rail parapet wall design on the Hwy 140 structure. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - An eastbound truck on Hwy 58A passes below the Hwy 140 structure over the Townline Tunnel Approach in Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #15 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #16 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Southbound distance guide sign on Hwy 140 at the Hwy 58A Junction. The distance shown on this sign is to the city centre. Motorists will actually enter the incorporated limits of the city just beyond the Townline Tunnel Approach Overpass. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing south along Hwy 140 towards Port Colborne from the Hwy 58A Junction in Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #17 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #18 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing north along Hwy 140 towards Welland approaching the Hwy 58A Junction. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on May 16, 2013  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Aerial view of Hwy 140 facing south towards Port Colborne from Buchner Road in Welland. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on June 18, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #40 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #43 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing east along East Main Street (Hwy 7146) from the top of the Welland Canal Tunnel's eastern portal. East Main Street intersects with Hwy 140 at the traffic signals immediately east of the tunnel. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Approaching the eastern portal of the East Main Street Tunnel. Although the tunnel may at first glance appear to be symmetrical, the north tube carrying westbound traffic and the pedestrian sidewalk is slightly wider than the south tube. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #42 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #41 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Eastern approach to the East Main Street Tunnel in Welland. The concrete barrier used in the highway median is actually not a retrofit median barrier. The East Main Street Tunnel is believed to have been the first highway project built in Ontario using a concrete New Jersey-style barrier (commonly known as a "Jersey Barrier"), when construction first began on the tunnel in 1970. With the bottom of the tunnel's vertical sag curve lying more than 100 feet (30 metres) below the adjacent intersection of Hwy 140, the gradient on the tunnel's approaches is 6% on either side. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - View of the relocated Welland Canal on top of the East Main Street Tunnel, facing north. The East Main Street Tunnel was actually built before the canal relocation was constructed. The diversion of the Welland Canal greatly improved traffic flow through Welland, as the canal's old route passed right through the city centre. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #44 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #45 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Pedestrians and cyclists must use the sidewalk within the tunnel's north tube to cross under the Welland Canal. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Sign marking the Welland Canal approaching the East Main Street Tunnel. The tunnel carries East Main Street below the relocated route of the Welland Canal that was constructed in the early 1970s. The East Main Street Tunnel was constructed by the Department of Highways of Ontario (DHO) under Contract #1970-10 and was completed and opened to traffic in 1972. The tunnel has a portal-to-portal length of approximately 724 feet (221 m). See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #46 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #47 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - A series of pre-stressed concrete beams form transverse support struts across both tunnel entrances. These struts counteract the immense pressures being exerted by the surrounding soils against the back of the high retaining walls on either side of the tunnel entrance. The struts also serve a secondary purpose - to shield motorists' eyes while either entering into or emerging from the tunnel and allowing them additional time to adjust to the change from artificial tunnel illumination to natural daylight, and vice-versa. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - North tube of the East Main Street Tunnel, facing west towards Welland. The north tube has a clear span width of 38 feet, 3 inches (11.66 m) and carries two 12-foot (3.66 m) traffic lanes along with a barrier-separated pedestrian sidewalk. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #48 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #49 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - View inside the north tube of the East Main Street Tunnel, facing east. The concrete barrier which separates the sidewalk from the traffic lanes is also original to the tunnel's initial construction in the early 1970s. The bottom of the Welland Canal lies about 30 feet (9 metres) above the tunnel's roadway. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing west along East Main Street towards Downtown Welland at the tunnel's western portal. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #50 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #51 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Wide transverse catch basins are in place at both portals to divert stormwater into a sump. There is a pump house located at each end of the tunnel which ejects runoff water collected in the tunnel's sump. When tunnels are constructed on a sag curve without positive drainage (as was the case here) an extensive series of water pumps are needed in order to keep the tunnel dry at all times. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - View of the western approach to the East Main Street Tunnel from atop the western tunnel portal. The Hwy 406 Junction can be seen in the background. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #54 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 140 #53 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - View of the East Main Street Tunnel's south tube, which carries eastbound traffic only. The south tube carries two 12-foot (3.66 m) traffic lanes and has a clear span width of 30 feet (9.14 m). The tunnel's top slab consists of a minimum thickness of 3 feet (0.91 m) of reinforced concrete, while the external walls have a minimum thickness of 3 feet, 3 inches (0.99 m) of reinforced concrete. The eastbound and westbound tubes are separated by a vertical support wall with a minimum thickness of 1 foot, 6 inches (0.46 m). See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing east towards the western portal of the East Main Street Tunnel in Welland. This tunnel provides an important transportation link between Hwy 406 and Hwy 140, as well as providing connections between East Main Street and Niagara Regional Road 27. The use of a concrete Jersey Barrier in the highway's median was an innovative solution by the DHO at the time the tunnel started into construction in 1970. The two tunnel tubes were spaced so closely that the provision of a double-sided steel beam guide rail barrier within this narrow median would have been rather impractical. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 140 #52 - © Cameron Bevers

Above - Approaching the Hwy 406 Junction on East Main Street, facing west towards Downtown Welland. At the time this photo was taken in 2011, this intersection was controlled by traffic signals. The intersection was subsequently converted to a modern roundabout. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on April 30, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





More King's Highway 140 Photographs Coming Soon!


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