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This page contains present day photos (Year 2000 to date) of Ontario's King's Highway 28, arranged by location from Peterborough northerly to Bancroft. All photographs displayed on this page were taken by the Webmaster (Cameron Bevers), unless specifically noted otherwise. Click on any thumbnail to see a larger image!

Please note that all photographs displayed on this website are protected by copyright. These photographs must not be reproduced, published, electronically stored or copied, distributed, or posted onto other websites without my written permission. If you want to use photos from this website, please email me first for permission. Thank-you!

Page 2: Present Day King's Highway 28 Photographs (Peterborough to Bancroft)


HWY 28 #47 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #48 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Peterborough County Road 4 Junction on Hwy 28 (Former Hwy 134) near Peterborough, facing south. This intersection is rather unusual, because it is under an All-Way Stop control. There are only a handful of All-Way Stop controlled intersections on Ontario's King's Highways. Interestingly, another example of an All-Way Stop controlled intersection on a provincial highway is located on Hwy 7A in nearby Cavan, at the junction with Peterborough County Road 10. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Fall colours on Hwy 28 (Former Hwy 134) between the Peterborough County Road 4 Junction and Lakefield. Former Hwy 134 was logically re-designated as Hwy 28 in 2003, as part of a widespread highway renumbering plan in the Peterborough area. Note the northbound passing lane which was built to provide motorists with an opportunity to pass slower heavy vehicles on this long uphill grade. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #49 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #21 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing south along Hwy 28 (Former Hwy 134), just south of Lakefield. The section of Hwy 28 between Lakefield and the Hwy 7 Junction east of Peterborough passes through an area with rather hilly topography. As a result, this highway offers motorists some very pleasant vistas of the road ahead. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - An old 19th Century truss bridge can be seen from the current Hwy 28 bridge at Youngs Point, north of Peterborough. This truss bridge was built in 1884-1885. It carried Hwy 28 traffic across the Otonabee River until the current high-level bridge at Youngs Point was built in the mid-1950s. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #22 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #23 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing north towards the Old Youngs Point Bridge along the former Hwy 28 alignment. The Old Youngs Point Bridge was constructed by the Dominion Bridge Company in 1884-1885. It is one of the oldest surviving truss bridges in the province. This one-lane bridge carried Hwy 28 traffic across the Otonabee River for two decades, from the time Hwy 28 was first designated through this area in 1934 up until the completion of the high-level bridge in 1954. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - The historic pin-connected wrought iron and steel truss bridge at Youngs Point is believed to be the only surviving example of its kind in Ontario. This structure represents an interesting transition in bridge construction techniques, since it was built using both wrought iron (commonly used in bridges built in the 1870s and 1880s) and steel, which has been used as a construction material in nearly all bridges built since the 1880s. In addition, the method of connecting the truss members together using pins fell out of favour by the 1890s, when rivets became the predominant method of assembling truss members. Thankfully, this attractive Pratt truss structure was thoughtfully preserved after the completion of the current Hwy 28 bridge at Youngs Point. The old bridge now serves as a pedestrian trail between Old Hwy 28 at the south end of the community of Youngs Point and the Trent-Severn Waterway Lock.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #24 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #25 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Eastern side of the Old Hwy 28 Bridge at Youngs Point, as seen from the Trent-Severn Waterway Lock. The Youngs Point Lock (Lock #27) allows marine traffic on the Trent-Severn Waterway to travel between Clear Lake and Katchewanooka Lake, bypassing these dramatic rapids on the Otonabee River. It is one of 44 locks on the Trent-Severn Waterway system.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - The old alignment of Hwy 28 at Youngs Point is still signed as such today. Sadly, this ancient fingerboard sign was replaced during a construction project a few years ago.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #26 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #27 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Former Hwy 28 alignment at Youngs Point, facing north towards the old bridge. The original highway alignment is now a quiet side street. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Former Hwy 28 alignment at Youngs Point, facing south towards Lakefield. A substantial diversion was built on Hwy 28 during the 1950s in order to construct a new high-level fixed-span bridge over the Trent-Severn Waterway at Youngs Point. As a result, bypassed portions of the original highway can be found both to the north and south of the Old Youngs Point Bridge.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #14 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #15 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Current Hwy 28 alignment facing north towards the Youngs Point Bridge. Approximately one mile of Hwy 28 was relocated onto a new alignment during 1953-1954 as part of the construction of the new high-level bridge over the Trent-Severn Waterway at Youngs Point. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Youngs Point Bridge on Hwy 28, facing north towards Bancroft. Structure completed in 1954. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #16 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #18 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Youngs Point Bridge on Hwy 28, facing south towards Lakefield.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - The current high-level Youngs Point Bridge was completed in 1954. It consists of two Warren-type steel pony truss spans and two steel beam approach spans. The Youngs Point Bridge is the only steel truss structure on Hwy 28, and is one of only a handful of steel pony truss structures left on the provincial highway system.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #17 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #19 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Close-up of the concrete bar-and-post handrail of the current Youngs Point Bridge on Hwy 28. The Youngs Point Bridge was rehabilitated in 2005-2006, so the original concrete bar-and-post handrail seen here was replaced by a standard solid concrete parapet wall.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Eastern side of the Youngs Point Bridge on Hwy 28, as seen from the Trent-Severn Waterway Lock. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #20 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #28 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Current Hwy 28 alignment facing south towards the Youngs Point Bridge. Originally, Hwy 28 passed by a short distance to the east, crossing the Trent-Severn Waterway on a bridge which had an opening span. The completion of the high-level bridge at Youngs Point in 1954 removed a serious traffic bottleneck on Hwy 28, since highway traffic no longer had to wait for marine traffic to pass by on the canal below. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Both the old and new bridges at Youngs Point can be seen from this photogenic vantage point just west of Hwy 28. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 25, 2004  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #9 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #34 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - South Burleigh Falls Bridge on Hwy 28. This three-span concrete "T" beam structure was completed in 1953. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing south along Hwy 28 towards Peterborough from the Perry Creek Bridge at Burleigh Falls.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #35 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #36 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Western side of the Perry Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Burleigh Falls. In 1966-1967, a major reconstruction project took place on Hwy 28 at Burleigh Falls, which saw two new high-level structures built along a new highway alignment through the community. In addition, a new intersection was built at Hwy 28 and Hwy 36, bypassing an awkward directional "Y" junction that had existed on the original highway since the 1930s.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Superstructure of the Perry Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Burleigh Falls. Structure completed in 1967. The unusual tapered piers make this otherwise plain prestressed concrete beam structure more aesthetically pleasing - something of a rarity in newer bridges.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #37 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #38 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Structure identification number and date stamp (1967) on the Perry Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Burleigh Falls.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Perry Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Burleigh Falls. The Hwy 36 Junction lies immediately north of the Perry Creek Bridge. As a result, the bridge is somewhat wider than what is typically seen on two lane King's Highways, because of the right-turn channelization and acceleration taper from Hwy 36 to southbound Hwy 28 and the left-turn lane from northbound Hwy 28 to Hwy 36. Thus, the bridge deck width becomes progressively wider as one views the structure from the south. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #39 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #40 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Eastern side of the Perry Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Burleigh Falls.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing south across the Perry Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Burleigh Falls. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #45 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #44 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Junction assembly marking the end of Hwy 36 at the Hwy 28 Junction at Burleigh Falls.
(Photograph taken on October 9, 2010  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Northern terminus of Hwy 36 at the Hwy 28 Junction at Burleigh Falls. This intersection is actually the relocated northern terminus of Hwy 36. From 1937 until the late 1960s, Hwy 36 ended at an old directional "Y" Junction with Hwy 28 just southwest of this point in Burleigh Falls. When Hwy 28 was reconstructed and relocated onto a new alignment through Burleigh Falls in 1967, Hwy 36 was also relocated so that it met Hwy 28 at this much-improved highway junction.
(Photograph taken on October 9, 2010  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #41 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #42 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - After traveling almost 75 km through the Kawartha Lakes region, Hwy 36 reaches its northern terminus at the Hwy 28 Junction at Burleigh Falls. Motorists turning right at this junction can return back to Hwy 7 near Peterborough by following Hwy 28 South through Burleigh Falls. Motorists turning left at the junction can follow Hwy 28 North to Bancroft. Hwy 28 is the principal through route through the northern portion of Peterborough County. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Old directional "Y" junction on Old Hwy 28 (Ojibway Drive) at Old Hwy 36 (Spur Road) at Burleigh Falls, facing south towards Peterborough. From 1937 until 1967, Hwy 28 and Hwy 36 met at this unusual intersection. Southbound traffic arriving at Burleigh Falls from Bancroft had the option of taking Hwy 28 South (left fork) to Lakefield and Peterborough or taking Hwy 36 South (right fork) to Bobcaygeon and Lindsay. Today, Ojibway Drive dead-ends about 650 metres ahead, so the old highway alignment no longer carries any through traffic.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #43 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #1 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Former northern terminus of Hwy 36 at Old Hwy 28 in Burleigh Falls. Traces of the south leg of the directional "Y" junction are still visible today, to the right of the hut. The south leg of the "Y" is seldom used anymore, since Ojibway Drive (Old Hwy 28) has been closed to through traffic at the Trent-Severn Waterway since the 1960s. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on September 23, 2007  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Timber trestle bridge over Eels Creek on Hwy 28 north of Burleigh Falls at Haultain. This 10-span timber trestle bridge is the last surviving timber bridge on Hwy 28.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #2 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #3 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Eastern side of the Eels Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Haultain. Structure completed in 1952.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Western side of the Eels Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Haultain. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #4 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #7 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - The Eels Creek Bridge at Haultain has a laminated timber deck. This bridge design was only used in a few locations across the southern half of Ontario. Laminated timber deck bridges are usually found in Northern Ontario, where local supplies of concrete may be difficult to find. In these instances, the MTO will often construct a laminated timber bridge instead of a concrete bridge.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Eels Creek Bridge on Hwy 28 at Haultain, as seen from the southwestern side. In 1952, the narrow steel pony truss bridge on Hwy 28 at Haultain was replaced by the current timber trestle bridge. The concrete abutments of the original steel truss bridge are still visible today on the western side of the highway. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #8 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 28 #10 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing south along Hwy 28 across the Eels Creek timber trestle bridge at Haultain.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Eastern side of the Eels Creek Bridge between Haultain and Apsley. This is one of several bridges over Eels Creek along the Hwy 28 corridor. The highway closely follows Eels Creek in the Apsley area. This single-span steel beam bridge replaced a timber structure, which dated from the original construction of this section of Hwy 28 in the 1930s.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 28 #11 - © Cameron Bevers

Above - Western side of the Eels Creek Bridge south of Apsley. Structure completed in 1953.
(Photograph taken on October 31, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)




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