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This page contains present day photos (Year 2000 to date) of Ontario's King's Highway 2, arranged by location from Belleville easterly to the Highway 49 Junction at Marysville. All photographs displayed on this page were taken by the Webmaster (Cameron Bevers), unless specifically noted otherwise. Click on any thumbnail to see a larger image!

Please note that all photographs displayed on this website are protected by copyright. These photographs must not be reproduced, published, electronically stored or copied, distributed, or posted onto other websites without my written permission. If you want to use photos from this website, please email me first for permission. Thank-you!

Page 15: Present Day King's Highway 2 Photographs (Belleville to Highway 49 Junction)


HWY 2 #514 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #515 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west along Dundas Street (Hwy 2) approaching First Street in Belleville. During the latter half of the 1930s, a section of Hwy 2 from Belleville easterly was reconstructed as a four-lane divided highway. The divided highway comes to an end about 1 km east of Downtown Belleville, after which Hwy 2 becomes a conventional four-lane arterial street. With its painted cedar posts and old luminaires, this section of Hwy 2 has an extremely vintage feel to it. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Beginning of the divided highway near First Street in Belleville, facing east. The median width starts out fairly narrow, but gradually tapers out to its full width. This 1930s-era divided highway is one of Ontario's most interesting historical King's Highways, as it dates from a period when dual highways were still in their infancy. The dual highway extends from the Belleville Hospital easterly for about 5 km to Point Anne Road, located west of Shannonville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #516 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #519 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Close-up of the painted cedar delineation posts on Hwy 2 approaching the end of the divided highway in Belleville. It has likely been many years since these cedar posts were last painted. At one time, Ontario painted all of its cedar delineation and guide rail posts, but this routine highway maintenance practice was eventually discontinued. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - An abandoned pedestrian tunnel exists underneath Hwy 2 near Third Street in Belleville. The south tunnel entrance has been closed off by a steel gate. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #518 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Above - Old staircase leading to the abandoned pedestrian tunnel underneath Hwy 2 in Belleville. This pedestrian tunnel is believed to have been constructed in 1937, when Hwy 2 was expanded from two to four lanes in this immediate area. The pedestrian tunnel was closed off at either end with steel gates many years ago, although recent graffiti suggests the tunnel still sees the occasional late night delinquent visitor. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #517 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #520 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Staircase entrance on the north side of Hwy 2 leading to the abandoned pedestrian tunnel. The old tunnel is situated at the very end of the divided highway. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing west along Dundas Street (Hwy 2) at the Belleville Hospital. The roof of the old pedestrian tunnel can be seen protruding from the ground at right. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #523 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #524 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along the divided highway approaching Bancroft Drive. Although Belleville's urbanized area has expanded to the east over the years, this section of Hwy 2 near Belleville's Hospital would have looked very similar decades ago as it does today. Jurisdiction over this section of Hwy 2 was transferred from the Department of Highways of Ontario (DHO) to the City of Belleville in July, 1950. As a result, this vintage section of Hwy 2 has remained more or less unmodified since DHO's initial construction of the dual highway in the 1930s. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Divided section of Hwy 2 in Belleville, facing west from Bancroft Drive. The end of the divided highway can be seen just ahead. When this section of Hwy 2 was rebuilt as a four-lane divided highway in the 1930s, it was situated in a rural area. The City of Belleville's eastern limits at that time were located at the Belleville Hospital (MacDonald Avenue). See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #521 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #522 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along the westbound lanes of Hwy 2 near Bancroft Drive. When the new dual highway was built between 1936 and 1938, this portion of the highway lay beyond Belleville's eastern city limits. Although this area is quite urbanized today, one can see considerable evidence that this was once a rural divided highway. Granular shoulders line both outside edges of the dual highway and the sidewalk at left was clearly an urban retrofit. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Divided section of Hwy 2 in Belleville, facing east from Bancroft Drive. Before the completion of Hwy 401 in the Belleville area, nearly all of Ontario's trans-provincial traffic would have used this section of Hwy 2. The drive between Toronto and Kingston was once tortuously slow, so the appearance of this short dual highway at Belleville would have undoubtedly been a welcome relief for early motorists ensnared on a seemingly endless two-lane highway! See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #525 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #527 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - The westbound lanes of Hwy 2 seen here formed the original two-lane route of Hwy 2, which was established back in 1919. A new carriageway was constructed at right in 1937 to carry two lanes of eastbound Hwy 2 traffic. Following the highway twinning, the original highway seen here was converted to carry westbound Hwy 2 traffic only. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Old median-mounted luminaires along the divided section of Hwy 2 in Belleville, facing west between Herchimer Avenue and Bancroft Drive. This style of luminaire is not known to have been used by the DHO, so the lighting system seen here was likely installed by the City of Belleville after they acquired jurisdiction over this section of Hwy 2 in 1950. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #526 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #528 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along Hwy 2 between Bancroft Drive and Herchimer Avenue in Belleville. As Hwy 2 continues east towards Herchimer Avenue, the highway begins to pass through much newer portions of the city. As a result, the old divided highway has witnessed many modifications towards the eastern end of Belleville's urbanized area. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Highway commercial development built along Hwy 2 in recent decades has resulted in the installation of several new median crossovers to accommodate left-turning vehicles. Accordingly, the section of Hwy 2 in the vicinity of Herchimer Avenue has been altered from its original 1930s appearance. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #529 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #530 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west along Hwy 2 towards Downtown Belleville from Herchimer Avenue. Construction of the divided highway from Belleville's eastern city limits to the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) crossing west of Bell's Creek started in the summer of 1937 under Contract #1937-213. This section of the dual highway was completed and paved during 1938. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Herchimer Avenue intersection on Hwy 2 in Belleville, facing east. The divided section of Hwy 2 rounds a long superelevated horizontal curve at this point. This left-turn lane was designed with an adverse crossfall, to ensure that any stormwater runoff continued to flow inwards away from the eastbound lanes and into the median's drainage swale. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #531 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #532 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Traffic signals at the Hwy 2 and Herchimer Avenue intersection in Belleville, facing west. Divided highways with wide medians such as this can create challenges in designing traffic signals, especially when there is also an aerial utility pole line running down the highway median. In this particular instance, the city elected to mount the secondary traffic signal head on a span-wire in order to place it closer to the innermost westbound traffic lane (Lane 1). See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing east along Hwy 2 from Herchimer Avenue in Belleville. The placement of an aerial utility pole line along the highway median may look very odd today, but this was likely a historical vestige from a much earlier time when only the westbound Hwy 2 carriageway existed. When Ontario's earliest divided highways were built in the 1930s, it was common practice for the DHO to leave any existing utility pole lines in place within the resulting median after the highway was twinned. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #533 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #535 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along Hwy 2 at Bay View Mall in Belleville. Despite being in an urbanized area today, this long sweeping horizontal curve serves as a reminder that Hwy 2 was historically a major inter-city highway and a critical link in Ontario's transportation network. Although it hasn't been a provincial highway for many years, Hwy 2 still carries a considerable amount of local traffic on the eastern approach to Belleville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Old distance guide sign on eastbound Hwy 2 departing from Belleville. This ancient sign likely dates from 1977, when Ontario's Highways were officially converted from Imperial to Metric measurements. For many years, an educational "km" tab was affixed to distance guide signs such as this to advise motorists that the distances were in kilometres, not miles. Most of these "km" tabs have been removed over the years. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #534 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #536 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - View of the divided highway, facing west towards Belleville from Old Kingston Road. The majority of the four-lane route of Hwy 2 east of Belleville was constructed by twinning the existing two-lane highway with a parallel carriageway to the south of the existing highway. However, a portion of the original Hwy 2 alignment near Bell's Creek was bypassed altogether by a four-lane motorway on a brand new alignment. Although not quite congruent with the modern-day term with its inference of full access control, DHO engineers of the 1930s often referred to any new four-lane highway construction as a "motorway". See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Western terminus of Old Kingston Road (Old Hwy 2) near Bell's Creek, east of Belleville. Up until the 1930s, the original 1919 route of Hwy 2 continued straight ahead towards Belleville. When the four-lane Bell's Creek Diversion was built in the 1930s, the old route of Hwy 2 seen here was modified so that it curved left to intersect with the new Hwy 2. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #537 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #538 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along Old Hwy 2 (Old Kingston Road). The newer four-lane diversion of Hwy 2 at Bell's Creek can be seen at right. A decision was made to build the divided highway on an entirely new alignment, rather than try to widen the existing highway. The original route of Hwy 2 had a very sharp curve on it east of Bell's Creek. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Inscription on a concrete culvert on Old Hwy 2 (Old Kingston Road) east of Belleville - "ONTARIO PROVINCIAL HIGHWAY 1920". See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #539 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #50 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Old Hwy 2 (Old Kingston Road) at Bell's Creek, facing east. This former highway loop served as the route of Hwy 2 from 1919 up until the construction of the adjacent Bell's Creek Diversion in 1936. Although it may seem hard to believe today, this quiet street once carried the vast majority of Ontario's trans-provincial highway traffic. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Autumn view of the Bell's Creek Diversion (Hwy 2) east of Belleville, facing east from Old Kingston Road. The dual highway east of Belleville was constructed between 1936 and 1938 as part of a program to improve highway access on the approaches to major Ontario cities in the late 1930s before grander, large-scale projects such as Hwy 401 were envisioned. Although these early divided highway sections are not very long, they are of great historical significance. They demonstrate the design characteristics of Ontario's early experimentation with four-lane highway construction before high-speed freeways were established as the preferred highway design for accommodating inter-city traffic. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on October 10, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #540 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #541 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along the Bell's Creek Diversion (Hwy 2) east of Belleville. About one mile of new motorway was constructed on an entirely new alignment approaching Bell's Creek. This marked the first time that Ontario constructed a divided highway on a new alignment. Built under Contract #1936-62, it was the first of two construction contracts awarded in 1936 and 1937 to build a dual highway from Belleville easterly to Point Anne Road. Construction began on the new motorway at Bell's Creek in the summer of 1936. The new highway was completed late in the year with a granular surface. Following the completion of the adjacent highway widening contract from Belleville to the CPR crossing, the entire divided highway was paved in 1938. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - A single tree stands in the median of Hwy 2 along the Bell's Creek Diversion. At one time, the DHO used to plant trees in highway medians such as this for beautification and aesthetic reasons. However, as these trees grew larger, they started to pose a potential collision hazard for motorists using the highway. Most of the trees within narrow highway medians such as this one were eventually cut down. Today, there are no longer any trees in the median of Hwy 2 east of Belleville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #542 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #543 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Western approach to the Bell's Creek Bridge on Hwy 2. The dual roadways converge as they approach the bridge into an undivided four-lane pavement. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing east along the westbound lanes of Hwy 2 approaching the Bell's Creek Bridge. The divided highway ends briefly as the two carriageways converge into a single pavement at the bridge. Although rather lacking in highway design aesthetics, this "hourglass" treatment was actually quite a common highway design practice in the earliest years of dual highway construction in Ontario. The initial phases of the Middle Road Superhighway (later known as the Queen Elizabeth Way) between Toronto and Burlington were similarly constructed. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #544 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #545 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Eastbound lanes of Hwy 2 approaching the Bell's Creek Bridge, facing east. The DHO's practice of constructing undivided four-lane pavements approaching bridges like this was short-lived, as this design inadvertently led to an unforeseen safety problem. When these undivided four-lane pavements were built on the Middle Road Superhighway, it was found that some motorists would use these sections as an unsafe passing opportunity. When an impatient tailing motorist encountered two slower vehicles driving alongside each other approaching a bridge, the tailing motorist would sometimes pull out into the opposing traffic lanes and drive three abreast on the undivided pavement in order to pass. Not only was this illegal, it was also incredibly dangerous - the motorist driving on the wrong side of the road had precious little time to get around the slower vehicles and cut back over before the divided highway resumed again. Beginning in 1938, the DHO mandated that all new divided highways in Ontario would be built with two separated carriageways across bridges in order to prevent this from happening. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing east across the Bell's Creek Bridge on Hwy 2 east of Belleville. This was one of two new structures built on the dual highway east of Belleville in 1936. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #47 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #548 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing west along Hwy 2 towards Belleville from the Bell's Creek Bridge. One of the key historical aspects of the divided section of Hwy 2 east of Belleville is its similarity in design to the original Middle Road Superhighway between Toronto and Burlington. Both highways were built around the same time (1936-1938), and both highways exhibited "parkway" features. Wide grass medians were constructed and trees were either preserved or planted in the highway median and adjacent to the travelled lanes. Although the Queen Elizabeth Way between Toronto and Burlington has been altered substantially over the years, the dual highway east of Belleville looks fairly similar today to when it was first built in the 1930s. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on October 10, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing west along the eastbound lanes of Hwy 2 from the Bell's Creek Bridge. Built at a time when many of Eastern Ontario's highways hadn't even been paved yet, the new motorway east of Belleville was well ahead of its time. Early dual highways such as this example foreshadowed the construction of Ontario's 400-Series Highways in later decades. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #48 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #46 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Northern side of the Bell's Creek Bridge on Hwy 2 east of Belleville. This single-span concrete rigid frame structure was completed in 1936. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on October 10, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - The undivided highway across the Bell's Creek Bridge is a rare surviving example of an obsolete DHO highway design practice. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on October 10, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #546 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #547 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Southern side of the Bell's Creek Bridge on Hwy 2 east of Belleville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Close-up of the steel and concrete handrail on the Bell's Creek Bridge on Hwy 2. Like many DHO-built bridges from the 1930s, embossed decorative stripes were set into the concrete of the Bell's Creek Bridge as an aesthetic treatment. This practice disappeared rather gradually. By 1950, the implementation of embossed decorative stripes such as this on new DHO-built bridges had become the exception rather than the rule. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #549 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #49 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west along Hwy 2 towards Belleville at the Bell's Creek Bridge. Note the divided highway resumes just beyond the structure. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - The dual carriageways of Hwy 2 converge into a single four-lane undivided pavement at the Bell's Creek Bridge. This highway design was also used on the approaches to major bridges on the Middle Road Superhighway (now the Queen Elizabeth Way) between Toronto and Burlington. As the Queen Elizabeth Way was reconstructed and widened in the 1950s and 1960s, bridges were also widened in order to separate traffic into a divided highway lane configuration. However, this modification never occurred on Hwy 2 at Bell's Creek, since traffic volumes dropped considerably after Hwy 401 was completed through the Belleville area in 1958. Thus, the Hwy 2 lane configuration at Bell's Creek was never modified and was left with its original undivided pavement design. The Bell's Creek Bridge is now the only surviving example of this interesting historical Ontario highway design practice. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on October 10, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #550 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #551 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - The divided highway resumes on the eastern side of the Bell's Creek Bridge and continues easterly to Point Anne Road. The 1930s-era diversion of Hwy 2 near Bell's Creek connects back with the original 1919 route of Hwy 2 (Old Kingston Road) at the top of the hill. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing west towards Belleville along the divided section of Hwy 2 near Elmwood Road. The original 1919 route of Hwy 2 now forms the westbound lanes of this divided highway, which can be seen at right. The eastbound lanes at left were built 17 years later, in 1936. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #552 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #554 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along the divided section of Hwy 2 approaching the twin bridges over Blessington Creek near Point Anne Road. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Southern side of the eastbound Hwy 2 structure over Blessington Creek. This single-span concrete rigid frame structure was completed in 1936. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #555 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #562 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - The eastbound Hwy 2 structure over Blessington Creek was in the process of being widened when this photo was taken. When this section of Hwy 2 was rebuilt as a divided highway in the 1930s, only one new structure was built to carry the eastbound lanes of Hwy 2. The old Blessington Creek Bridge which carried all Hwy 2 traffic up until that point was left in place. Following the construction of the dual highway, the original Blessington Creek Bridge was converted to carry westbound Hwy 2 traffic only. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Steel and concrete handrail on the eastbound Hwy 2 structure over Blessington Creek. Embossed decorative stripes were set into the concrete on this bridge. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #556 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #553 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - View of the twin Hwy 2 structures over Blessington Creek, facing east towards Shannonville. The eastbound (1936) structure was widened in 2008 in order to provide wider shoulders. As originally designed in the 1930s, this bridge had virtually no shoulders. The approaching roadway had two 11-foot traffic lanes, but the horizontal clearance between the bridge's curbs was only 23 feet. The westbound Hwy 2 structure over Blessington Creek can be seen at left. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - A sidewalk was built along the southern side of the eastbound Hwy 2 structure over Blessington Creek. Note the proximity of the traffic lanes to the curb line. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #557 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #558 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west towards the twin Hwy 2 structures over Blessington Creek. The westbound structure at right was built much later than its eastbound counterpart. At the time of the divided highway's construction in 1936, a decision was made to retain an old concrete arch bridge on Hwy 2 over Blessington Creek. The concrete arch bridge was built in 1924, and was scarcely 12 years old at the time of the highway twinning. The old bridge continued to carry the westbound lanes of Hwy 2 across Blessington Creek for many more years, until it was ultimately replaced in 1958 with the current highway structure seen here. Wherever feasible, all efforts were made to replicate the eastbound (1936) structure for the replacement westbound structure. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Southern side of the westbound (1958) Hwy 2 structure over Blessington Creek. The westbound bridge is also a single-span concrete rigid frame structure. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #559 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #560 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Sidewalk along the northern side of the Blessington Creek Bridge on westbound Hwy 2. The one design feature of the 1936 eastbound structure that was (fortunately) not replicated on the replacement westbound structure was the lack of shoulders across the bridge. The replacement westbound structure was designed with appreciable shoulder widths. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Attention to detail: Even the embossed decorative stripes were replicated on the westbound (1958) Blessington Creek replacement structure. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #561 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #491 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - The divided highway comes to an end just before Hwy 2 reaches Point Anne Road. Built shortly before the outbreak of World War II, the 3-mile section of divided highway east of Belleville is quite the time capsule. It offers highway enthusiasts with a rare view of early divided highway construction practices in Ontario. Had it not been for the outbreak of war in 1939, it is quite likely that many additional miles of divided highway would have been built through Eastern Ontario. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on August 17, 2008  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing west along Hwy 2 towards Belleville from York Road in Shannonville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #488 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #487 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west along Hwy 2 towards Belleville at the Salmon River Bridge in Shannonville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Salmon River Bridge on Hwy 2 in Shannonville. This single-span concrete girder structure was completed in 1969. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #489 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #490 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along Hwy 2 across the Salmon River Bridge in Shannonville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Scenic view of the Salmon River in Shannonville, as seen from Old Hwy 2 (York Road). The current Hwy 2 structure can be seen in the background. As originally established in 1919, Hwy 2 followed York Road and Young Street through Shannonville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #492 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #493 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Western approach to the Shannonville Canadian National Railway (CNR) Subway on Hwy 2. This structure is located about 2 km east of Shannonville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - View underneath the Shannonville Canadian National Railway (CNR) Subway on Hwy 2. When this railway grade separation was completed in 1929, it eliminated a particularly hazardous at-grade railway crossing on Hwy 2. The highway previously crossed the railway at a badly-skewed crossing. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #494 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #495 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Date stamp (1929) on the Shannonville Canadian National Railway (CNR) Subway on Hwy 2 between Belleville and Deseronto. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - The Shannonville Canadian National Railway (CNR) Subway was recently expanded to allow for a third track across the structure. This view is of the eastern approach to the Shannonville Subway on Hwy 2, showing the more recent expansion structure. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #496 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #497 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - An empty section of Hwy 2, about 4 km east of Shannonville. The once-busy Trans-provincial Highway witnessed a precipitous drop in traffic volumes after the Belleville Bypass (Hwy 401) was officially opened to traffic on October 7, 1958. Following the completion of Hwy 401, most long-distance through traffic began to use the freeway instead. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Former eastern terminus of the Belleville Bypass (Hwy 401) approaching Hwy 2. For several years after the Belleville Bypass was completed in 1958, Hwy 401 curved to the south at Wyman Road near Shannonville. Until Hwy 401 was completed through to Napanee in the 1960s, Hwy 401 came to an end at this T-intersection with Hwy 2 as a temporary measure. This once-busy highway junction between the temporary route of Hwy 401 and Hwy 2 saw its traffic burden evaporate overnight, when Hwy 401 was opened to traffic as an interim two-lane facility between Wyman Road and the Hwy 41 Interchange in Napanee on November 1, 1963. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #502 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #499 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west along Hwy 2 towards Belleville at the Marysville Creek Bridge. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Southern side of the Marysville Creek Bridge on Hwy 2. This single-span concrete rigid frame structure was completed in 1968. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #500 - © Cameron Bevers             HWY 2 #501 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Structure identification number and date stamp (1968) on the Marysville Creek Bridge. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Northern side of the Marysville Creek Bridge on Hwy 2 east of Belleville. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)





HWY 2 #498 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Above - Facing east along Hwy 2 at the Marysville Creek Bridge. The routes of Hwy 2 & Hwy 49 join together at the community of Marysville 3 km ahead. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photograph taken on July 2, 2012  -  © Cameron Bevers)




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