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Hwy 8 Photo Index      On to Hwy 8 - Historical Photos (1960-1969)

This page contains historical photos of Ontario's King's Highway 8 dating from 1920 to 1959. All photographs displayed on this page were taken by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation, unless specifically noted otherwise. Historical photographs are arranged in approximate chronological order. Click on any thumbnail to see a larger image!

Please note that all photographs displayed on this website are protected by copyright. These photographs must not be reproduced, published, electronically stored or copied, distributed, or posted onto other websites without my written permission. If you want to use photos from this website, please email me first for permission. Thank-you!

Page 1: Historical King's Highway 8 Photographs (1920-1959)


HWY 8A #1

Above - Circa 1925 postcard view of the Hwy 8 and Hwy 8A junction in St. David's. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photo Courtesy of F.H Leslie Ltd.)





HWY 8 #274

NEW Above - Bituminous penetration pavement on the Hamilton-Queenston Highway (Hwy 8) showing surface treatment applied in 1927. The mixture applied was 1/5th gallon "Heavy Cutback" asphalt and 15 pounds of stone chips and coarse sand applied per square yard. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken in 1927.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1927)





HWY 8 #90

Above - View of Hwy 8 facing east towards the 20 Mile Creek Bridge at Jordan. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on October 8, 1935.
(Photo © Archives of Ontario  -  Series RG-14-162-5-119, Photo #8)





HWY 8 #1

Above - New bridge over 20 Mile Creek at Jordan in 1937. This new concrete structure was built in 1936 to replace the narrow steel pony truss bridge seen in the previous 1935 photo. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1937)





HWY 20 #63

Above - Circa 1937 photo of the distance sign at the exit from the old Honeymoon Bridge in Niagara Falls. This sign directed traffic to Hwy 8 and Hwy 20, which were the two main highway routes leaving Niagara Falls at that time. The completion of the Queen Elizabeth Way to Niagara Falls in 1940 greatly improved highway access to the rest of Ontario from the Niagara Peninsula. The distance sign seen here was removed after the ill-fated Honeymoon Bridge collapsed in 1938, when a winter ice jam on the Niagara River undermined the structure. The replacement Rainbow Bridge was completed a short distance downstream in 1941. Note the newly-completed Oakes Garden Theatre in the background, which still stands today at the corner of River Road and Clifton Hill. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken circa 1937.
(Photo from Cameron Bevers' historical photograph collection  -  Original photographer unknown)





HWY 8 #281

NEW Above - Circa 1940 photo of a porcelain enamel King's Highway 8 route marker. See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photo from Cameron Bevers' historical photograph collection  -  Original photographer unknown)





HWY 8 #273

NEW Above - Circa 1948 postcard view of Hwy 8 (Ontario Road) in Downtown Mitchell, facing west from St. Andrew Street towards the Hwy 23 Junction. Note the angled street parking located in the centre of the highway. Where the pavement width allowed, many Ontario towns permitted this type of angled street parking in the early days of Ontario's highway system, as it was an easy way to increase the supply of parking spaces in high-demand downtown areas. This practice was generally discontinued during the 1950s as traffic volumes on highways increased, as it was safer to provide parking spaces in off-street parking lots rather than in the centre of busy downtown streets. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken circa 1948.
(Photo from Cameron Bevers' historical photograph collection  -  Original photographer unknown)





QEW #774

NEW Above - Circa 1950 photo of motorists standing beside an older Elizabeth Regina "ER" and King's Highway 8 route marker junction assembly on the Queen Elizabeth Way near St. Catharines. These Elizabeth Regina "ER" route markers were originally used to sign the Queen Elizabeth Way, but the meaning of the Latin "ER" abbreviation for Queen Elizabeth was lost on all but the most educated. The signs were eventually replaced with a new series of route markers in the mid-1950s, which more logically abbreviated the highway's name as "QEW". See an Enlarged Photo Here.
(Photo from Cameron Bevers' historical photograph collection  -  Original photographer unknown)





HWY 8 #276             HWY 8 #277

NEW Left - Department of Highways of Ontario (DHO) Brantford-Anthony Sand Spreader in operation along Hwy 8 near Winona. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on November 28, 1951.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)

NEW Right - New Brantford-Anthony Sand Spreader parked at the Winona Patrol Yard, DHO District #4 (Hamilton District). The spreader was developed by DHO maintenance staff to carefully control the application rate of sand and salt, depending on the road conditions. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on November 28, 1951.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1951)





HWY 8 #78

Above - A scenic section of Hwy 8, 4 miles east of Beamsville in 1952. Note how small the Hwy 8 sign pole is on the right side of the highway. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on May 7, 1952.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1952)





HWY 8 #275             HWY 7 #527

NEW Left - DHO Magnetic Nail Picker in operation along Hwy 8 near Stratford. One of the more curious units in the DHO's maintenance fleet, the Magnetic Nail Picker collected thousands of pounds of nails and other scrap metal from Ontario's highways each year. The nail picker was especially valued during and right after World War II, when vehicle tires were in extremely short supply. Motorists who had the misfortune of getting a punctured tire from driving over a piece of scrap metal could find themselves stranded indefinitely. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on July 28, 1952.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1952)

Right - New Nith River Bridge (Rau Bridge) on a partially-completed diversion of Hwy 7 & Hwy 8 at New Hamburg in 1952. This diversion initially only carried local traffic to a Waterloo County Road (Bleams Road). However, the Rau Bridge was ultimately incorporated into the New Hamburg Bypass, which was completed in its entirety and opened to traffic in 1957. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on July 31, 1952.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1952)





HWY 8 #278             HWY 8 #279

NEW Left - Grading for a new earth cut on Hwy 8, 1/2 mile east of Clinton, Contract #1953-33. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on October 15, 1953.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1953)

NEW Right - Completed earth cut and vertical profile correction on Hwy 8 east of Clinton prior to paving. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on August 19, 1954.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1954)





HWY 8 #280

NEW Above - Completed hot-mix paving on Hwy 8, 6 miles west of Seaforth, Contract #1955-81. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken on October 28, 1955.
(Photo courtesy of Ontario Ministry of Transportation  -  © Queen's Printer for Ontario, 1955)





HWY 20 #68

Above - Circa 1957 view of Clifton Hill (Hwy 3A & Hwy 20), facing east at Falls Avenue in Niagara Falls. Note the triple King's Highway route marker sign assembly for Hwy 20, Hwy 3A & Hwy 8 on the traffic signal pole and the large guide sign marking the route to the Rainbow Bridge. The oversized yellow traffic signal back plate also bears an interesting but simple message to motorists - "DRIVE SAFELY". See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photo taken circa 1957.
(Photo from Cameron Bevers' historical photograph collection  -  Original photographer unknown)





HWY 8 #25

Above - View of Hwy 8 between Kitchener and Preston in 1957, facing west. This photo shows the divided section of Hwy 8 near Sportsworld Drive prior to the urbanization of this part of Kitchener. The former site of the Pioneer Sportsworld recreation area is located to the right of the highway while the former site of Lulu's Roadhouse is located to the left. This divided highway was built in the late 1930s and still exhibits most of its original design characteristics in this 1957 photo. Note the trees planted in the highway's median. The original cross section of this highway was substantially altered during reconstruction of Hwy 8 in the 1960s and 1970s, so the road looks quite different today. See an Enlarged Photo Here. Photograph taken on August 16, 1957.
(Photo © Archives of Ontario  -  Series RG-14-151-18, Box B1104, Photo #576)




Continue on to King's Highway 8 Historical Photos from 1960 to 1969



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