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This page contains present day photos (Year 2000 to date) of Ontario's Queen Elizabeth Way, arranged by location from Etobicoke Creek westerly to the Highway 403 Interchange in Oakville. All photographs displayed on this page were taken by the Webmaster (Cameron Bevers), unless specifically noted otherwise. Click on any thumbnail to see a larger image!

Please note that all photographs displayed on this website are protected by copyright. These photographs must not be reproduced, published, electronically stored or copied, distributed, or posted onto other websites without my written permission. If you want to use photos from this website, please email me first for permission. Thank-you!

Page 9: Present Day QEW Photographs (Etobicoke Creek to Hwy 403)


QEW #715 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #716 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along the Queen Elizabeth Way towards Toronto approaching the Evans Avenue and East Mall Interchange. The Etobicoke Creek Bridge lies just beyond the exit ramp. Etobicoke Creek marks the municipal boundary between the Cities of Mississauga and Toronto. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on June 15, 2010  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Advance exit sign for the Dixie Road Interchange on the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. Presently, there is only direct access to Dixie Road from the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. Traffic wishing to access Dixie Road from the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way must exit at the Cawthra Road Interchange, located about 2 km to the west. The Dixie Road Interchange will be rebuilt in the coming years. As part of these improvements, a new off-ramp to Dixie Road will be built from the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 12, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #717 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #707 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west along the Queen Elizabeth Way towards Hamilton at the Dixie Road Interchange. The Dixie Road exit ramp actually merges the North Service Road first, which in turn connects to Dixie Road. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 12, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Approaching the turn-off to Dixie Road from the North Service Road in Mississauga. Traffic bound for Dixie Road in either direction must turn right at the intersection. Through traffic can also continue straight ahead along the North Service Road, which more or less parallels the Queen Elizabeth Way to the Hwy 10 Interchange (Hurontario Street). See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #708 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #705 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along the North Service Road towards the Queen Elizabeth Way off-ramp. From Dixie Road easterly, the North Service Road is one-way street (westbound only). Note the raised asphalt rumble strips across the North Service Road, indicating to drivers to slow down before reaching the intersection. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Intersection of the North Service Road and the Dixie Road Connector, facing west. This strange intersection is only under stop control on the west leg, facing eastbound traffic on the North Service Road. The remainder of the turning movements are free-flow. All eastbound traffic must turn left here, as the North Service Road becomes a one-way street beyond this intersection. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #704 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #703 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing north along the Dixie Road Connector from the North Service Road. This road joins Dixie Road North and the Dixie Road Overpass at the next signalized intersection. Traffic wishing to access Dixie Road South must turn left and use the overcrossing, while traffic bound for Dixie Road North can continue straight ahead to join Dixie Road. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - North Service Road at the Dixie Road Connector, facing east. All eastbound traffic on the North Service Road must stop and turn left onto the Dixie Road Connector here, as the opposing side of the intersection is a one-way street heading westbound only. Note the flashing warning beacon and Do Not Enter sign, advising drivers not to proceed any further east. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #706 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #709 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west along the North Service Road from the Dixie Road Connector. The Dixie Road Overpass can be seen in the distance. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Approaching the end of the Dixie Road Connector, facing south. This short road connects the North Service Road to the Dixie Road Overpass and Dixie Road North. The Queen Elizabeth Way lies behind the brown and green noise attenuation wall beyond the intersection. Up until 1953, Dixie Road met the Queen Elizabeth Way at a pair of offset at-grade intersections. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #710 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #711 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Northern end of the Dixie Road Overpass, facing north. Traffic wishing to access the North Service Road or the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way can use the Dixie Road Connector, at right. Traffic bound for Dixie Road North must turn left at the traffic signals. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Approaching the Dixie Road Overpass over the Queen Elizabeth Way, facing south. This overcrossing was built in 1952-1953, in order to eliminate a pair of dangerous at-grade intersections on the Queen Elizabeth Way at Dixie Road North and Dixie Road South. The curved roadway was designed to connect the two offset legs of Dixie Road together. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #714 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #712 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Dixie Road Overpass, as seen from the Toronto-bound lanes of the Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - The Dixie Road Overpass is a three-span concrete rigid frame girder structure, which was completed in 1953. The outer spans bridge the North and South Service Roads, while the centre span crosses the Queen Elizabeth Way itself. The Dixie Road Overpass was the first grade separation built along the Queen Elizabeth Way following World War II. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #682 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #680 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along the North Service Road from the Dixie Road Overpass. The intersection with the Dixie Road Connector can be seen in the background. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - View of the Queen Elizabeth Way, facing east towards Toronto from the Dixie Road Overpass in Mississauga. Prior to 1953, a pair of at-grade intersections at Dixie Road North and Dixie Road South existed a short distance east of the Dixie Road Overpass. This problematic intersection complex had a very dubious safety record. In 1948, the Department of Highways of Ontario (DHO) undertook an extensive operational study for the intersection complex. In an effort to mitigate the number of traffic collisions at the two intersections at Dixie Road, traffic signals were installed on the Queen Elizabeth Way as a temporary measure. Ultimately, both intersections were closed during construction of the new Dixie Road Overpass and the service road system in 1952-1953. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #683 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #684 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing south across the Dixie Road Overpass at the Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing west along the North Service Road from the Dixie Road Overpass. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #685 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #686 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing west along the Queen Elizabeth Way towards Hamilton from the Dixie Road Overpass in Mississauga. When the Queen Elizabeth Way was first constructed in the 1930s as the "Middle Road" Highway, it was built with an undivided four-lane pavement between Etobicoke Creek and a point about 1 km west of Dixie Road. As part of the Dixie Road Overpass construction in 1952-1953, the Queen Elizabeth Way was converted from an undivided four-lane highway with at-grade intersections and local access points to a proper controlled-access freeway. A centre median strip was also built as part of this project in order to eliminate all left turns from the highway. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - View of the Dixie Road Interchange's southwest quadrant. This bizarre interchange has ramps which connect to the South Service Road, rather than the Queen Elizabeth Way itself. Although this interchange design may seem very strange to observers today, it is important to recognize that freeway design was still very much in its infancy in Ontario at the time the interchange was built in the early 1950s. It was a time where engineers with the DHO experimented with various interchange designs. Although this interchange layout may be viewed as being somewhat unconventional today, it was certainly a significant safety improvement to the Queen Elizabeth Way at the time it was built. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #687 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #688 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - View of the narrow centre median on the Queen Elizabeth Way, facing west from the Dixie Road Overpass. The Queen Elizabeth Way was rebuilt as a four-lane divided highway through the Dixie Road Interchange in 1952-1953, and was subsequently widened to six lanes in 1960. In order to fit in an extra lane in each direction, the grass median was filled in and a narrow concrete curb and gutter median was built, along with a double-sided steel beam guide rail centre median barrier. This type of median barrier treatment was first utilized during construction of the Shooks Hill Rotary Interchange at Southdown Road near Clarkson in 1959. This median treatment proved successful in protecting the narrow median from vehicle encroachment, and was thus implemented at the Dixie Road Interchange as well. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing north across the Dixie Road Overpass on the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #699 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #700 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Eastern side of the Dixie Road Overpass across the South Service Road in Mississauga. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Concrete girder superstructure of the Dixie Road Overpass on the Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #689 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #694 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - The Dixie Road Overpass was used as a model for several other overpasses built along the freeway section of Hwy 27 in Etobicoke in the early 1950s. The Bloor Street, Burnhamthorpe Road and St. Clair Avenue West (today's Rathburn Road) structures built along the upgraded section of Hwy 27 were all very similarly-designed, with a main centre span over the freeway and side spans to accommodate the service roads. The three-span structures built along Hwy 27 were all demolished in the late 1960s and early 1970s to make way for the Express-Collector Lane system upgrades along Hwy 27 (now Hwy 427). See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Green guide sign on southbound Dixie Road, marking the interchange ramps to the South Service Road and Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #693 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #690 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Dixie Road Ramps in the southwest quadrant of the interchange, facing northwest. Traffic wishing to access Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way must stay to the right and follow the loop ramp. Traffic continuing straight ahead will arrive at the South Service Road. In the coming years, the entire Dixie Road Interchange will be reconstructed, which will allow Toronto-bound traffic to exit directly to Dixie Road. Today, traffic must use the adjacent Cawthra Road Interchange ramps to access Dixie Road from the west. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Inner cloverleaf loop ramp at the Dixie Road Interchange on the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga. Note the 1950s-era DHO luminaires along the ramps. This ramp carries traffic from southbound Dixie Road to the South Service Road, and ultimately, the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #691 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #692 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - General view of the Dixie Road Overpass and Interchange, facing northeast. The interchange ramps in the southwest quadrant are comparatively spacious, considering how constrained the ramps are on the north side of the interchange. Even at the time the Dixie Road Interchange was built in the early 1950s, the north side of the Queen Elizabeth Way was already quite developed. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - End of the Dixie Road ramp to the North Service Road in the southwest interchange quadrant. Traffic from Dixie Road wishing to reach the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way must turn left and follow the South Service Road to the adjacent Cawthra Road Interchange. Heavy trucks are prohibited on the South Service Road, except when they are on local delivery. Niagara-bound traffic can also use the North Service Road to reach the Queen Elizabeth Way, although this route is slightly longer. Interestingly, this left turn "stem" on the loop ramp was a fairly early retrofit to accommodate two-way traffic on the South Service Road. As originally built in 1952-1953, the South Service Road carried only one-way traffic (eastbound only). See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #695 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #696 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Ramps connecting the South Service Road to Dixie Road, facing southeast. The Dixie Road Interchange is somewhat unique for a freeway in the Greater Toronto Area, in that it has changed very little since it was first built in the early 1950s. Apart from the cars on the road and the conversion of the two service roads to two-way traffic, this historical interchange would have looked quite similar in 1953, right after it was completed. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - View of the South Service Road and Dixie Road Interchange Ramps, as seen from the Dixie Road Overpass. Note the now-disused 1950s-era bus loop contained within the Dixie Road ramps. It is interesting to note that the DHO often designed bus loops into their urban freeway interchanges during the 1950s. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #681 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #713 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing east along the South Service Road from the Dixie Road Overpass. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - A 1950s-era DHO luminaire still stands on Cormack Crescent (Old Dixie Road South) beside the Dixie Road Overpass. This short section of Dixie Road South was bypassed when the adjacent Dixie Road Overpass was completed in 1953. Today, the road carries traffic from northbound Dixie Road to the South Service Road and the ramp to the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #698 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #697 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Eastern terminus of the South Service Road at Park Royale Boulevard in Mississauga. Beyond this point, a single-lane entrance ramp connects to the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. Although it was first introduced at Dixie Road in 1952-1953, the service road system was ultimately extended all the way down to the Niagara Peninsula during the 1950s and 1960s, as the DHO slowly began to assert full access control along the Queen Elizabeth Way. Before the service road system was built, adjacent property owners had virtually unrestricted driveway access to the highway. Click here to see a 1937 Historical Photo, showing the original four-lane undivided highway in this area before it was converted to a freeway during the 1950s. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Toronto-bound on-ramp to the Queen Elizabeth Way from the South Service Road east of Dixie Road. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #701 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #298 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Western side of the Dixie Road Overpass across the South Service Road in Mississauga. The embossed concrete embellishments on the Dixie Road Bridge's fascia were often used on early Ontario freeway structures built between the mid-1930s and mid-1950s. The newer concrete patch above the arch was completed as part of a recent bridge rehabilitation. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing east along the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way from the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass. The pole-mounted traffic camera beside the right shoulder is part of the Ministry of Transportation's COMPASS freeway traffic management and incident response system, which is now in place on most Toronto-area freeways. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #290 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #291 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Eastern side of the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass across the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga. Structure completed in 1959. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Western side of the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass. This structure spans both the Queen Elizabeth Way and the North and South Service Roads. The pedestrian bridge was built to link communities that were severed when the Queen Elizabeth Way was converted from a scenic parkway into a controlled-access freeway during the 1950s. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #292 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #293 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - The Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass is a fully-accessible facility, which is rather surprising given the age of the bridge. Very few pedestrian facilities of this vintage are barrier-free. The pedestrian bridge is located about half-way between the Dixie Road and Cawthra Road Interchanges. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing west along the South Service Road from the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass. The service roads were built beside the Queen Elizabeth Way during the 1950s in order to eliminate all private entrances along the highway. Previously, most properties along the QEW had direct driveway access onto the highway. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #294 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #295 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing east along the South Service Road from the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass. There is very little right-of-way available along the Queen Elizabeth Way through Mississauga, as the highway was initially designed in this area as a four-lane divided highway with a narrow centre median. The noise attenuation barriers at left mark the edge of the highway right-of-way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Northern end of the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass. The bridge connects to the Applewood Village Shopping Centre on the North Service Road. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #296 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #297 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing west along the North Service Road from the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass. Many of the homes and businesses along the North Service Road are original, and had direct driveway access onto the Queen Elizabeth Way itself until the late 1950s. By contrast, most buildings along the southern side of the Queen Elizabeth Way were demolished in order to widen the highway. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing east along the North Service Road from the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass. Since many of the buildings along the north side of the Queen Elizabeth Way are commercial in nature, there is a gap in the noise attenuation barrier along the highway in this area. The limited highway right-of-way for the Queen Elizabeth Way is quite apparent in this photo. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #299 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #310 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing west along the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way from the Ogden Avenue Pedestrian Overpass. Note the narrow highway median and lack of an inside shoulder. When the Queen Elizabeth Way (Middle Road) was first designed through Mississauga in the first half of the 1930s, it was never planned with any provisions for future expansion. At the time, it was felt that a four-lane road would adequately serve expected traffic volumes well into the future. As traffic volumes grew dramatically on the highway during the 1950s, engineers with the DHO were faced with the difficult challenge of widening the highway along a very constrained urban corridor. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Western side of the Cawthra Road Overpass on the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #300 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #301 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - An older Queen Elizabeth Way freeway entrance sign at the Cawthra Road Interchange in Mississauga. Most signs along this freeway now feature the "QEW" abbreviation for Queen Elizabeth Way enclosed in a white crown, similar to the crown used on other 400-Series Highways. "Crownless" signs such as this one are becoming quite rare along the Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - New Queen Elizabeth Way freeway entrance sign, showing the "QEW" abbreviation in a crown. The use of compass directions on these signs has (unfortunately) become more prevalent along the Queen Elizabeth Way in recent years. Until recently, the use of compass directions has been discouraged on Queen Elizabeth Way signs, since the highway doubles back on itself by reversing directions (from west-to-east and from east-to-west) once it enters the Niagara Peninsula at Hamilton. Traditionally, the highway was signed as "QEW Hamilton", "QEW Niagara" and "QEW Fort Erie" heading towards Buffalo, New York and "QEW Toronto" heading away from Buffalo, New York. In my personal opinion, it should have stayed that way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #302 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #303 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing east along the Queen Elizabeth Way from the Cawthra Road Interchange in Mississauga. Note the use of ramp metering signals on both Toronto-bound on-ramps. Ramp metering signals were installed along the Queen Elizabeth Way through Mississauga during the 1970s, in an effort to improve traffic flow on the highway during the morning rush hour. The intention of ramp metering is to regulate the rate of vehicle entry onto the freeway, so that the number of vehicles seeking entry to the freeway doesn't surpass the freeway's ability to absorb those vehicles into the traffic stream. Ramp metering generally works best on urban freeways, where intersection traffic signals exist on the surface street upstream of the freeway interchange. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Close-up view of the one of the metered ramps leading onto the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way from Cawthra Road. The ramp metering signals are set up with a short but variable cycle length, which allows only one vehicle to pass per green interval when the meter is activated. As the freeway nears capacity, the red intervals can be extended, thereby restricting the rate of vehicle entry onto the freeway. By reducing the number of vehicles entering the freeway, it helps to stabilize the traffic flow on the freeway and reduces the likelihood of a queue forming at the ramp merge. Note that Ontario ramp metering signals rest in green when the ramp meter is inactive. In many jurisdictions, the signal is "dark" (turned off altogether) when the ramp meter is inactive. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #311 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #304 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Advance warning sign on Cawthra Road indicating the upcoming ramp metering signal. When the ramp meter is activated, the alternating amber flashers on these warning signs are turned on. While ramp metering is used successfully in many North American jurisdictions to control freeway traffic, Ontario has surprisingly few interchanges where ramp metering has been installed. All of Ontario's ramp meters are located on the Toronto-bound lanes of the Queen Elizabeth Way through Mississauga. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Eastern side of the Cawthra Road Overpass on the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga. This four-span AASHTO-girder structure was completed in 1979. This bridge replaced a single-span concrete rigid frame girder structure which had been built to carry Cawthra Road over the Queen Elizabeth Way back in 1956. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #305 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #306 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing south across the Cawthra Road Overpass on the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing east along the Queen Elizabeth Way towards Toronto from the Cawthra Road Overpass. The Cawthra Road Interchange has a short sub-collector lane system below the structure. Until this interchange was rebuilt in the late 1970s, Cawthra Road only had a partial set of interchange ramps, which essentially only connected to the service road system. Access between the service road ramps and Cawthra Road was fairly cumbersome. Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way traffic could exit to the South Service Road east of Cawthra Road, and North Service Road traffic could enter the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way from the North Service Road. However, traffic wishing to access Cawthra Road from the service road ramps had to either U-turn on the service roads, or pass through residential neighbourhoods in order to reach Cawthra Road. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #307 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #308 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing west along the Queen Elizabeth Way towards Oakville from the Cawthra Road Overpass. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Structure identification number and date stamp (1979) on the Cawthra Road Overpass on the Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #309 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #211 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing west along the sub-collector lane at the Cawthra Road Interchange. There are no ramp metering signals for the ramps leading to the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Southern side of the Cooksville (Dillon's) Creek Bridge on the Queen Elizabeth Way and the Service Roads east of Port Credit. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 17, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #212 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #720 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Close-up view of the Cooksville (Dillon's) Creek Bridge on the Queen Elizabeth Way. This small concrete rigid frame arch bridge was constructed as part of the original Middle Road Highway in 1932 and has been extended over the years to its current width. Several bridge widening stages are visible in this photograph. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 17, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Advance overhead guide sign for Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) on the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #60 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #133 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - North entrance to the pedestrian underpass at Port Credit, located just east of the Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) Interchange.
(Photograph taken on May 11, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Looking through the Port Credit Pedestrian Underpass from the north portal. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 10, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #134 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #61 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - South entrance to the pedestrian underpass below the Queen Elizabeth Way at Port Credit. A pedestrian underpass was originally completed east of Hwy 10 in 1937, in order to provide a safe passage for schoolchildren underneath the newly-constructed Middle Road to a nearby school. The underpass had to be relocated slightly to the west in 1961, as a result of reconstruction of the Hwy 10 Cloverleaf on the Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 10, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Approach to the south entrance of the pedestrian underpass at Port Credit, just east of the Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) Interchange.
(Photograph taken on May 11, 2003  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #702 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #720 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Facing north through the Port Credit Pedestrian Underpass on the Queen Elizabeth Way east of Hurontario Street (Hwy 10). See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Aerial view of the Port Credit (Hwy 10) Cloverleaf on the Queen Elizabeth Way, facing north. This full eight-ramp cloverleaf was constructed in 1962. It replaced a much earlier cloverleaf interchange at Hwy 10, which had been constructed in 1937. As originally built in 1937, Hwy 10 crossed over the Middle Road Highway (Queen Elizabeth Way). When the cloverleaf was rebuilt in 1962, Hwy 10 was realigned so that it passed below the Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on November 14, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #721 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #132 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Aerial view of the Port Credit (Hwy 10) Cloverleaf on the Queen Elizabeth Way, facing northeast. Note the houses lining the north side of the Queen Elizabeth Way to the left of this photo. At the time these houses were constructed, they fronted directly onto the Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on November 14, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Northern side of the Queen Elizabeth Way Overpass at the Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) Cloverleaf. This single span concrete girder structure was completed in 1962. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 10, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #213 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #214 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing north towards Cooksville along Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) from the Queen Elizabeth Way Overpass. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 17, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Facing south towards Port Credit along Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) from the Queen Elizabeth Way Overpass. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 17, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #215 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #216 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Facing north along Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) towards the Queen Elizabeth Way cloverleaf and overpass. This was the location of Canada's first cloverleaf interchange in 1937. The original interchange was reconstructed in 1962. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 17, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Southern side of the Queen Elizabeth Way Overpass at Hwy 10 (Hurontario Street). See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 17, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #728 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #719 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Distance guide sign on the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way, facing west from the Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) Interchange. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Advance overhead guide sign for Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) on the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. This overhead sign was later modified to include a reference to South Service Road, which is also directly accessible from the Hurontario Street exit ramp. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #718 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #727 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Advance overhead guide sign for Hurontario Street (Hwy 10) and South Service Road on the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 12, 2011  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing east along the Toronto-bound Queen Elizabeth Way from the Credit River Bridge. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on July 4, 2009  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #723 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #74 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Aerial view of the Credit River Bridge on the Queen Elizabeth Way, facing northeast. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on November 14, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)

Right - Northern side of the Credit River Bridge on Queen Elizabeth Way, facing west towards Oakville. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 10, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #131 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #729 - © Cameron Bevers

Left - Credit River Bridge on Queen Elizabeth Way. The original four-lane highway bridge was built in 1934, but the structure was widened in 1960 to permit an extra highway lane in each direction. The inside arches are part of the original 1934 structure, while the outer arches were added in 1960 when the Queen Elizabeth Way was widened to 6 lanes. The "ER" light standards were thoughtfully preserved on this bridge for many years, but were removed in early 2009. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 10, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Facing west along the Niagara-bound Queen Elizabeth Way towards Oakville across the Credit River Bridge. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on April 10, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #724 - © Cameron Bevers             QEW #725 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Left - Aerial view of the Erin Mills Parkway & Southdown Road Interchange on the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga, facing northwest. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on November 14, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)

NEW Right - Aerial view of the Erin Mills Parkway & Southdown Road Interchange on the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga, facing northeast. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on November 14, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)





QEW #726 - © Cameron Bevers

NEW Above - Aerial view of the Winston Churchill Boulevard Interchange on the Queen Elizabeth Way in Mississauga, facing north. This interchange was built in 1978 to replace an earlier interchange at Upper Middle Road. The old Upper Middle Road Interchange had to be closed down in the late 1970s in order to make way for the new Hwy 403 Interchange near the Ford Plant in Oakville. See an Enlarged Photo here.
(Photograph taken on November 14, 2005  -  © Cameron Bevers)




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